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Pachinko

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Pachinko ist eine Mischung aus Geldspielautomat und senkrechtem Arcade-Spiel, die in Japan sehr populär ist. Die oft bunt gestalteten Pachinko-Spielhallen mit Dutzenden, teilweise auch Hunderten von Automaten finden sich heute überall in Japan. Pachinko (jap. パチンコ) ist eine Mischung aus Geldspielautomat und senkrechtem Arcade-Spiel, die in Japan sehr populär ist. Die oft bunt gestalteten​. Pachinko | Lee, Min Jin | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher mit Versand und Verkauf duch Amazon. Pachinko (National Book Award Finalist) | Lee, Min Jin | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher mit Versand und Verkauf duch Amazon. Ihr Leben als Pachinko-Spiel. Von Axel Weidemann. Aktualisiert am - Leben als Glücksspiel: Kundin spielt in einer Pachinko-Halle in Fuefuki.

Pachinko

Pachinko ist eine Wissenschaft für sich und insbesondere für Touristen eine, die man nicht so leicht versteht. Pachinko-Hallen erkennt man entweder an den. Ihr Leben als Pachinko-Spiel. Von Axel Weidemann. Aktualisiert am - Leben als Glücksspiel: Kundin spielt in einer Pachinko-Halle in Fuefuki. Was ist Pachinko? Es ist vor allem eines: wahnsinnig laut. Öffnen sich die elektrischen Glasscheiben einer der Spielhöllen, taucht.

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Japan's Biggest Gaming Obsession Explained - Pachinko I loved Sunja. Told in chronological order, this book spans 4 generations and nearly a century of time and focuses on Zainichi or ethnic Koreans living in Japan. A friendly courtship of sorts follows. I was really loving it, thinking it might be a 5 star read, but then it seems to throw in so agree, Amtsgericht Sonthofen remarkable topics, and some were glossed over, or I did not get the resolution I desired. Her father has died and she and her mother run a boarding house, earning money by taking in lodgers. It is difficult to think of any novel published in the last couple of years that is even comparable to Pachinko. Preciosa, intensa y dura novela. De Wikipedia, la enciclopedia libre. Opiniones You clearly articulated many of my disorganized thoughts.

What I know about the history of Koreans in Japan wouldn't fill the back of a postage stamp. To call my knowledge of the culture and politics of east Asia in the 2oth century a blindspot would be offensive to actual blindspots.

Honestly, all my knowledge of Japan comes from Sondheim's Pacific Overtures What I'm saying is that I probably know minus-information about this area of the world and its history.

So Pachinko was a real history lesson for me. But, as the Financial Times' review put it, 'we never feel history being spoon-fed to us.

Through them we witness WWII and the division of Korea, the stories and journeys of the millions of post-war Korean migrants in Japan a people known to the Japanese as the Zainichi , and the frank bigotry that many of them and their subsequent generations faced in Japanese society.

One of the novel's best characters, the Dickens-loving Noa, is described as having to 'pass' for Japanese and even hides his true Korean identify from his wife and children.

I had no idea about any of this stuff and it was truly eyeopening. But the novel is not just a history lesson: it's a veritable soap opera.

I described it to one of my friends as 'Maeve Binchy goes to Asia'. There are twists and turns in Pachinko that would have caused Jackie Collins to down the driest martini.

Love, marriage, betrayal, kimchi, death. I mean, the yakuza play a very significant role in this novel. It's a blockbuster of a book.

Your mother who only reads Danielle Steel deep-cuts would get as much enjoyment out of this as a thesis student in Asian Studies.

I devoured Pachinko. It is a somewhat dense pages but I had to constantly pull myself away from it. If left to my own devices the whole book would have been conquered in just one prolonged sitting.

Sunja's story captivated me, Noa's story intrigued me, Mozasu's story broke me, Hansu's story enraged me, Solomon's story gave me hope, and Yangjin, the woman who starts it all, she enthralled me from page one.

It is difficult to think of any novel published in the last couple of years that is even comparable to Pachinko. One year since its publication and it has already been deemed a modern classic.

Min Jin Lee has created a literary juggernaut. And I loved it. View all 4 comments. Despite this being a pg mini brick of a book, I absolutely flew through Pachinko on two commutes and a night.

It's a sweeping, multi-generational epic of a Korean family, and we follow their collective and individual rises and falls, triumphs and failures, in - in Korea under Japanese occupation, and in Japan from - as expatriates and Zainichi Koreans.

The characters are memorable, well-drawn, and their circumstances and hurdles extremely compelling, from family shame of Despite this being a pg mini brick of a book, I absolutely flew through Pachinko on two commutes and a night.

The characters are memorable, well-drawn, and their circumstances and hurdles extremely compelling, from family shame of out of wedlock pregnancy to hunger and pride and war-time privations.

I was eager to learn more and follow these family members further, but I also wanted to the story to go on as long as possible. It's ambitious, and Lee pulls it off masterly in my opinion.

Four stars from me: not an instant classic I'll put on my immediate re-read list, but I wouldn't be surprised if I do pick it up again in the years to come.

There are so many great ideas floating throughout - what makes a nation? There's a lot to unpack on an intellectual level, and though I knew some things about the Japanese occupation and horrifying sexual slavery of Korean and other occupied Asian women as wartime "comfort women" and other pieces of the complex, complicated Japan-Korea historical relationship that only in recent years is beginning to fully normalize, I was consistently learning new ideas and words and concepts I'd never heard of prior, but these were introduced well and explained within the context of the story, so I hoovered up the information easily and eagerly.

It's the family that provides the emotional push to read. I found Lee's style to change slightly as the setting and time period change, from beautiful but simple, quiet prose during the - portion on the little, provincial island of Yeong-do in Korea, to maintaining its beauty but upping the punch and zip as the family changes location to Japan and enters the modern era, with the eerie, looming mood of pre and during WWII giving way to a slightly more upbeat and fresh tone with the family's bettered circumstances in - , but tempered by their Korean background and outsider, unwanted status in Japan.

The simple kindness of Hoonie whom kicks off the family but we never get to know well, and his strong, smart wife Yangjin; the quiet grace and devotion of Kyunghee and her husband Yoseb's evolution from man of strength and shame to fraility and greater shame; the endurance and resolution of Sunja, the engimatic, sometimes villianous but also pitiable Koh Hansu, the Christian paragon and family renewer Isak; the goodhearted, bold Mozasu as a foil to his studious, solemn half-brother Noa and their comparative experiences of passing in Japan and how they experience and internalize shame for different familial reasons in addition to their shared Korean heritage I would heartily recommend this to lovers of family and historical epics of varying lengths, lovers of beautiful but easy reading prose and where lots of plot and events are occurring but the writing is calm so you don't feel overwhelmed by the action, and those with an interest in Japanese and Korean-set historical fiction and really getting a painless education into a complex political and cultural connection.

View all 17 comments. And yet we played on, because we had hope that we might be the lucky ones. How could you get angry at the ones who wanted to be in the game?

Pachinko was a foolish game, but life was not. This book and Wikipedia have educated me on the topic. The way I envision pachinko is as a cross between a pinball machine and a slot machine.

But folks will return again and again and spend hours in front of this parlor game with the hope of winning the big one.

Pachinko can also be likened to the lives of the numerous characters that populate this generational family saga and historical fiction novel.

They make choices, they pull the lever if you will, sometimes controlling what happens to them, but very often affected by the outside influences of others, especially those with more power.

Some of the characters in this book work for or run pachinko parlors, but the reader spends very little time in these gaming facilities —I would have been running in the other direction otherwise!

What this book does provide us with is a rich story about a family that finds its roots in Korea during the early s and straight through to late s Japan.

I love learning about countries and cultures of which I know nothing or very little. This book did not disappoint in that aspect.

Much of this is heartbreaking, frustrating, and even maddening — due to the multiple injustices suffered by this Korean family both in their home country under colonial rule by Japan, as well as in Japan where they emigrated in search of more opportunities, safety and security.

What they often found there was hatred and racial prejudices. They faced identity crises that some were able to rise above and others were not fortunate enough to overcome.

They were often discriminated against in the workplace, receiving lower wages than their Japanese counterparts.

They were called names, considered lazy, even referred to frequently as criminals. Their living conditions were run-down. Children were bullied in their schools.

The only alternative to these conditions seemed to be to return to Korea — but this means of escape was even worse following World War II with the widespread starvation and the introduction of communism in the north.

So, the family remained in Japan and made a life, despite the oppression and limitations they faced. This book was rather hefty, but I never tired of it.

I did learn so much about the culture, the politics though not heavy-handed , and a bit of the history of both Korea and Japan.

There were many characters as the novel covers a lengthy span of time, but I never grew confused. I did feel a bit of a distancing from the characters themselves, and they were not quite multilayered enough.

I savor wonderfully complex characters. One character, a young man named Noa, may have fit the bill here, but a couple more multidimensional individuals may have enriched this aspect of the book a bit more for me personally.

However, I did feel much sympathy towards many of the family; their struggles were real and quite believable.

I most admired the women who fought so hard for their families, their children, and worked tirelessly to survive and make ends meet.

They were resourceful and brave despite their very quiet and unobtrusive bearing. The last two-thirds to one-fourth of the novel felt a bit more rushed and I was slightly less invested in the storylines of these characters than I was in those initial players.

I would be more than happy to read more of Min Jin Lee in the future. View all 49 comments. Greta Wonderful review Candi! Jun 30, AM.

Candi Greta wrote: "Wonderful review Candi! I h Greta wrote: "Wonderful review Candi! I hope you enjoy this one. I'll be watching out for your thoughts on it when you finish!

What a sweeping, beautiful and heartbreaking novel this was. This book follows a four-generational family, originally from Korea, living in Japan.

It shows how our decisions can have an effect on many things in our future lives. This book first takes place in Korea, It starts with a couple who have one child, their beloved daughter Sunja.

When Sunja is enamored by a local yakuza: Hanku, she soon falls pregnant and unbeknownst to her, after the discovery of pregnancy, she learns that Hanku is already married and with his own children.

Due to the highly placed value of female virginity in Korea, the family faces ruin from Sunja's pregnancy. But then a Christian minister offers a chance of salvation for the family: a new life in Japan as his wife.

To bring salvation to herself and to her family, Sunja follows the minister to Japan to live in a hostile country.

Here she faces severe discrimination from the Japanese for being Korean. She moves to a country where she has no friends or home. The book then details her life and those of her family's over the generations.

This book details the tensions of being Korean in Japan and how this is maintained over generations. It shows a part of history that is not always mentioned and not that well known.

While the character's struggle with their identity in a hostile country, it shows determination to persevere and endure.

Aug 11, Liz rated it really liked it Shelves: book-clubs. I had this in my TBR queue for ages. It took making it a book club selection to bring it to the front of the line.

I loved Sunja. She is just so strong. She struggles but always finds a way to persevere. There is nothing better than a well done historical fiction.

This one fits the bill. I knew next to nothing about the Japanese annexation of Korea and the issues that followed.

And I knew nothing about the Koreans that actually lived in Japan. There are multiple points in this book when the way the Japanese treated the Koreans reminded me of how blacks were treated here in the US.

The same prejudices. And the same belief by the underclass that they needed to be so much better to make it. I got so engrossed with the story that the pages flew by.

I found the first half of the book much more interesting than the second. It made it much harder to relate to anyone.

I almost felt the book would have been stronger if it had ended sooner. View all 25 comments. Told in chronological order, this book spans 4 generations and nearly a century of time and focuses on Zainichi or ethnic Koreans living in Japan.

Up until recently they had to apply for alien registration cards that required fingerprinting every three years and were rarely granted passports making overseas travel impossible.

In Japan, ethnic Koreans are seen as sec Told in chronological order, this book spans 4 generations and nearly a century of time and focuses on Zainichi or ethnic Koreans living in Japan.

In Japan, ethnic Koreans are seen as second class citizens and even now are still shut out of higher positions.

We follow a Korean family struggling to survive in that environment. The language is plain and unadorned but wields tremendous emotional heft.

There are parts that just destroyed me but it never descends into misery porn. And while it moves at a languid pace through time I could have happily stuck around for another pages.

It touches on aspects of passing, of not only surviving but succeeding in an adopted country that can be hostile to your very identity.

Quite simply, I loved these characters and the book just blew me away. View 1 comment. Dec 28, Dem rated it really liked it Shelves: historical-fiction , korea.

A rich and vivid story spanning nearly years from Korea at the start of the 20th century to pre-war Osaka and finally Tokyo and Yokohama.

Pachinko is a long novel that is beautifully crafted, elegant, passionate with characters that you find yourself rooting for and caring about while reading and will remember long after the novel has ended.

The couple have one child, their beloved daughter Sonja. When Sonja falls pregnant by A rich and vivid story spanning nearly years from Korea at the start of the 20th century to pre-war Osaka and finally Tokyo and Yokohama.

When Sonja falls pregnant by a married yakuza the family face ruin. But a christian minister offers a chance of salvation, a new life in Japan as his wife.

There are many wonderfully imagined characters in this novel but the characters of Sonja and Kyunghee really brought this book to life and for me captures what it is to be a daughter, a mother, and a wife in any coulture.

There was so many times these two woman near broke my heart in this story and I loved how strong and memorable they both these women were.

This is a story of what it means to be an outsider in a foreign country and the struggles that go with trying to fit in and yet trying to maintain and hold on to a little of the past and couture they were born into.

A real page turner, a story with a heart and soul, full of likable and dislikable characters that will have you hooked from page one and you will have difficulty parting with on finishing the novel I came across this book while book browsing in a book store and overheard a lady ask the store assistant to recommend a multigenerational type book that would keep her attention over the christmas period and the assistment recomemmended Pachinko and after she gave a brief synopsis of the story I decided I had to have it too and this is why books stores and their staff are worth their weight in gold and we readers should tap into their book knowledge every time we visit a bookstore.

I recommend this to readers who enjoy multi generational novels, historical fiction or character driven novels.

I think this would also make an excellent book club read as there is so much here to discuss. View all 28 comments.

Rating 3. I would get it from the library and return it. But it was a National Book Award finalist, so it should be good.

My library got the audio and I had to wait months to get it, so it should be good. It's historical fiction and I love that, so it should be good.

Don't get me wrong, I liked it, but I had many issues with it. Pachinko tells the story of several generations of one Korean family.

You first start out, learning about this family and Rating 3. You first start out, learning about this family and how they live in Korea.

But then, due to war, they are moved to Japan. Eventually we learn of Sunja, a young peasant girl, the daughter of a poor family who runs a boarding house for fishermen.

She becomes pregnant at a very early age, which is scandalous. But one of the boarders who knew of her father, marries her and takes her to Japan.

You learn about her history and her children and children's children. This is one family sweeping saga that spans years.

You learn the strife of Koreans living in Japan, the racism that they faced, assimilating into Japanese culture, the customs and ways of the Japanese.

That part I loved hearing about. I loved hearing about Korea and the food, it took me back to a trip that I had to Korea.

Then, we switched to Japan, which I just adore. You learn of the Pachinko parlors as one family member runs. Oh the pachinko parlors, they were absolutely insane.

Think Vegas amplified, with lots of wild colors, and high vibe atmosphere. I really enjoyed being able to think back to my time there.

But the book was too long, it often jumped around. I really enjoyed learning about Sunja, her parents, and her children.

But when her children, got older, it seemed to be all over the place. It cover many topics such as racism, war, strife, suicide, gay men, loose women, the Yakuza, AIDS, and more.

I think this book could have been trimmed down quite a bit. I was really loving it, thinking it might be a 5 star read, but then it seems to throw in so many topics, and some were glossed over, or I did not get the resolution I desired.

Overall, glad I read this one. I ultimately picked it up for my Japanese reading challenge. Though focused on Koreans, much of the book takes place in Japan.

So this was a perfect fit for the challenge. View all 54 comments. This book blew me away. It was powerful, heart breaking, educational and inspiring.

View 2 comments. We are deemed to be the directors of our lives and its consequences. Truth be told, we then become the receptors marked by the shadows of others upon us Min Jin Lee begins her story in in Yeongdo, Busan, Korea with Hoonie, plagued by physical impairments, and his wife who live in a small fishing village.

These are the first stones in this multigenerational family mosaic. After many miscarriages and infant deaths, they are overjoyed at the birth of a healthy daughter We are deemed to be the directors of our lives and its consequences.

After many miscarriages and infant deaths, they are overjoyed at the birth of a healthy daughter, Sunja. Sunja thrives with her parents' love and the tradition of hard work within their small boardinghouse.

She becomes acquainted with an attractive man, Hansu, from the village and meets him in a secluded area.

He is smitten with Sunja. It is now that Sunja's stone in the mosaic will take a curved turn. She becomes pregnant and the married Hansu cannot take this relationship further.

A benevolent minister, suffering from tuberculosis, offers to marry Sunja, but in doing so, the couple must move to Japan for his ministry.

This stone is cast farther into the unknown. Sunja and Yangjin will live with his brother and sister-in-law in a tiny house in the part of the village designated for Koreans.

And here the mosaic takes on a darker hue. The Japanese treat the Koreans as "unclean" and they are ridiculed throughout this time period as the Japanese eventually inhabit Korea itself.

As war threatens, food and a sense of livelihood becomes scarce. Yangjin and his fellow ministers are arrested and taken to prison by the Japanese for not bowing to the image of the emperor.

His brother must take care of the family now. The mosaics flow tragically in a downward spiral. Throughout Pachinko we will experience individuals desperately making decisions that will affect this family profoundly.

Jealousies, passions, dark secrets, and hatred will visit upon them. The internal cog of this wheel results in painful instability in this family while the outer rim is bent by conditions outside their realm.

History and its aftermath can be a cruel master. What struck me the most is the single thread of loss of identity as two countries inhabit what was once separate domains.

It becomes the oppressed and the oppressor. The Japanese culture overshadows all that is Korean in language, religion, and certainly in social status.

Later, Korea finds itself in a dust storm eventually by the Russians and even the Americans as events unfold.

Pachinko, a lengthy undertaking, is filled with an undying spirit in which we all can relate to no matter where the beginning of your mosaic takes place The author is masterful at teaching us history, examing motives with a generous heart, and letting us think for ourselves.

The audio narrator is amazing too. View all 10 comments. Aug 22, Cristina Monica rated it really liked it Shelves: family-history , historical-fiction , adult.

This is not a book that will make you happy. It has its happy moments, happy scenes, but those scenes usually involve heartbreak as well.

The contrary also happens. You expect the worst to happen — and it almost does — but then someone saves the day, like the time when Sunja was in danger and a hero appeared.

Is there really someone who managed to finish this one in one sitting or one day even? Because I knew absolutely nothing about the tensions between Koreans and the Japanese, to me this was not only a family tale, but also a long overdue history lesson.

View all 3 comments. I borrowed this novel mainly due to the fact that I had very general knowledge of the Japanese occupation of the Korean Peninsula, however, I knew nothing of the Korean immigrants living in Japan.

The novel is what we call a saga, with the time span of around eighty years and set both in Korea and Japan, and is interesting with regard to the history, customs and traditions, both Japanese and Korean, however, there is little depth regarding the character development.

Having said that, I admit tha I borrowed this novel mainly due to the fact that I had very general knowledge of the Japanese occupation of the Korean Peninsula, however, I knew nothing of the Korean immigrants living in Japan.

Having said that, I admit that the stories of their lives are interesting. If Min Jin Lee writes another novel, I might give it a try.

I definitely recommend the audiobook as the narrator does a splendid job. En general es un libro entretenido.

Una obra interesante. No defrauda. Novela emocionante y dura. Recomiendo ampliamente esta lectura.

Preciosa, intensa y dura novela. Muy muy buen restaurante. Destacar como se trata la carne.

Se preocupan de agradar y Una comida original, con productos de calidad. El personal explica todos los platos.

Calidad razonable pero sin grandes alardes. Recomendable tanto por semana como fines de semana.

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Pachinko Pachinko jap. Je stärker die Familie um Sunja wächst und vergeht, je intensiver Lee den einzelnen Lebensfäden der Söhne und Kindeskinder in einem Land nachspürt, in dem die Kunst der Aneignung immer höher bewertet wurde als die der Integration, desto go here folgt man click here Kampf um ein lebenswertes Dasein in der Diaspora. Immer auf dem Laufenden Sie haben Post! Https://fatenodeh.co/online-casino-free-money/norderney-stellenangebote.php einblenden. Ihre Kinder schicken sie auf japanische und amerikanische Universitäten, eine Art Camouflage. Zu den Sachpreisen gehören jedoch auch Feingoldbarren mit einem jeweiligen Einzelwert unter An der Seite von Sunja geht simply Beste Spielothek in DСЊrrnhausen finden curiously durch die Jahrzehnte, in denen sie und ihre Schwägerin die Familie als Kimchi-und-Toffee-Verkäuferin ernähren, in denen das Geld oft nicht einmal für Tee reicht. Für die Spieler ist die blinkende und bunte Maschine ein echtes Highlight. Viele Bürger haben die Befürchtung, dass durch die möglich zukünftig steigende Anzahl an Casinos und Spielbanken, immer mehr Kriminelle in das Land kommen. Pachinko-Automaten funktionierten anfangs rein elektromechanisch Wsop Live Stream hatten keinen Geldspielautomatenteil. Mehr Full Haus über Pfeil nach links. Mittlerweile haben sich jedoch die Umstände etwas entspannt. N oa ist Koreaner und kann es doch nicht sein. Die Wehrbeauftragte will eine Debatte über die Wiedereinsetzung. Die Asiaten sind generell sehr bekannt für ihre Freude am Glücksspiel. So lange ist es gar nicht her, dieses , als Japan Korea als Kolonie besetzte. Wohlstand als Pachinko-Unternehmer - und doch verpönt. Was ist Pachinko? Es ist vor allem eines: wahnsinnig laut. Öffnen sich die elektrischen Glasscheiben einer der Spielhöllen, taucht. Jedes Jahr geben die Spieler in Japan über Milliarden Dollar für Pachinko aus. Dabei handelt es sich um vertikale, flipper-ähnliche. Perfekte Pachinko Stock-Fotos und -Bilder sowie aktuelle Editorial-Aufnahmen von Getty Images. Download hochwertiger Bilder, die man nirgendwo sonst. Pachinko ist eine Wissenschaft für sich und insbesondere für Touristen eine, die man nicht so leicht versteht. Pachinko-Hallen erkennt man entweder an den. Ihre Kinder schicken sie auf japanische und amerikanische Universitäten, eine Art Camouflage. Man kann diese Punkte beim Preisschalter einlösen. Sie soll die Aktivitäten der zukünftigen Spielbanken prüfen und überwachen, aber auch untersuchen, ob es durch die neue Gesetzeslage zu sozialen Schäden für die Bevölkerung kommt. Fakten Hersteller. Wenn das Glücksspielgesetz komplett umgesetzt worden ist, dann darf man Pachinko in den Casinos natürlich auch ohne die Ausnutzung der Grauzone spielen. Dafür erntet sie go here Kritik. Manchmal ist es zwingend, sich selbst im Anderen zu spiegeln. Teilen Sie Ihre Meinung. AGB Datenschutz Impressum. Sie erzählt von den Männern der Familie, die Spiele Reelcash - Video Slots Online anstellen möchte, weil sie Koreaner sind, und die sich continue reading als Betreiber von Pachinko- Spielsalons here machen - verpönt als zwielichtige Gangster mit Lasterhöhlen. Als Japaner mit Zainichi zu leben, sie zu lieben: ein Skandal. Dabei handelt es sich um vertikale, flipper-ähnliche Spielautomaten. Zwischen dem Vermittler und Kassierer ist nun lediglich eine Glaswand aufgebaut, um sich rechtlich abzusichern. An der Seite von Sunja geht es durch die Jahrzehnte, in denen sie und ihre Schwägerin die Familie als Kimchi-und-Toffee-Verkäuferin ernähren, in denen das Geld oft nicht einmal für Tee reicht. Pachinko The contrary also happens. I was really loving it, thinking it might be a 5 this web page read, but then it seems to throw in so many topics, and some were glossed over, or I did not get the resolution I desired. This book blew me away. This is source and yet convoluted. Kindle Editionpages. Preciosa, intensa y dura novela. Showing Being Korean, Https://fatenodeh.co/online-casino-free-money/beste-spielothek-in-gotteszell-finden.php Faith, and a pastor's wife

Mientras tanto, Mozasu ha ganado mucho dinero y tiene sus propios salones de pachinko. Su primer gran proyecto consiste en convencer a una anciana mujer coreana para que venda sus tierras para poder construir un campo de golf, y lo consigue tras llamar a Goro, amigo de su padre.

Ya mayor, Sunja visita la tumba de Isak y reflexiona sobre su vida. Esto da a Sunja la tranquilidad que necesita y entierra una foto de Noa junto a la tumba de Isak.

Los temas principales de Pachinko son el racismo , los estereotipos y el propio juego del pachinko. De Wikipedia, la enciclopedia libre.

Vistas Leer Editar Ver historial. English Editar enlaces. Grand Central Publishing. Estados Unidos. In the early s, teenaged Sunja, the adored daughter of a crippled fisherman, falls for a wealthy stranger at the seashore near her home in Korea.

He promises her the world, but when she discovers she is pregnant--and that her lover is married--she refuses to be bought. Instead, she accepts an offer of marriage from a gentle, sickly minister passing through on his way t In the early s, teenaged Sunja, the adored daughter of a crippled fisherman, falls for a wealthy stranger at the seashore near her home in Korea.

Instead, she accepts an offer of marriage from a gentle, sickly minister passing through on his way to Japan. But her decision to abandon her home, and to reject her son's powerful father, sets off a dramatic saga that will echo down through the generations.

Richly told and profoundly moving, Pachinko is a story of love, sacrifice, ambition, and loyalty.

From bustling street markets to the halls of Japan's finest universities to the pachinko parlors of the criminal underworld, Lee's complex and passionate characters--strong, stubborn women, devoted sisters and sons, fathers shaken by moral crisis--survive and thrive against the indifferent arc of history.

Get A Copy. Kindle Edition , pages. Published February 7th by Grand Central Publishing. More Details Original Title. Korea Osaka Japan.

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Deborah I think the game of Pachinko represented life for the Koreans in Japan. There was always the hope that they would have good luck--but, as with the pac …more I think the game of Pachinko represented life for the Koreans in Japan.

There was always the hope that they would have good luck--but, as with the pachinko machines in the novel, someone was always making little adjustments to make sure that they never won.

What is the connection between the entire novel and pachinko? Priyamvada Because somehow the game of Pachinko and the story of Sunja are correlated.

The idea may not occur while reading the book, but once you have finished …more Because somehow the game of Pachinko and the story of Sunja are correlated.

The idea may not occur while reading the book, but once you have finished it, you'd realise how similar the blueprint of Sunja's life had been to that of the game.

Now, Pachinko, as a rule, is not entirely a game of chance - it requires technique and observation Ofc, that matters only when you've got some luck in your pocket.

Sunja's trysts with Hansu were a result of her chance encounter with the bullys. Osaka had been a dream to her, which eventually became the birthplace of her nightmares.

Her survival during the war, the changes in the life of her sons, and her relations could all be attributed to chance, yet not entirely - exactly like Pachinko.

Moreover, as a game banned during the world war II, Pachinko thrived and flourished in Japan after it's nadir. But it was largely associated to the rise of Yakuza or Japanese mafia.

Since the game was never considered equivalent to gambling, the parlors became a mecca for criminal activities, prostitution and unpaid taxes.

All in all, it could hardly be considered a decent job during the time. However, it could put more than food on people's palates, and was the only field where the Koreans could associate with the Japanese on an equal footing.

Undoubtedly, such parlors became a haven for the war-torn Koreans, who had lost seemingly everything. And as long as one had riches, what did it matter if the job weren't decent?

But the then Japan held many prejudices against those parlors and the Koreans. Lee has brought out the fact that all of them weren't bees of the same hive sticking to criminal activities.

Had it not been for Pachinko, Sunja's sons would have never survived. Even the righteous Noa was compelled to take it up as his means of livelihood.

And as the author has related, "history had failed them" so they had to detach themselves from history's favoritisms. In the end, Sunja and the people related to her couldn't be called fortunate though they did turn out to be so more than most of the Koreans.

What do you call such a life with huge losses that can neither outshine your gains nor underwhelm their importance? Perhaps, Pachinko.

See all 44 questions about Pachinko…. Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Average rating 4. Rating details. More filters.

Sort order. Start your review of Pachinko. Alright, after thinking about this one for the last 24 hours or so, I think I've figured out how to articulate what I didn't like about it.

But first I want to start with the stuff I did really enjoy. I had no idea about any of the historical context within which this book was set.

And I found learning about it, especially as the author traced these themes and historical elements th Alright, after thinking about this one for the last 24 hours or so, I think I've figured out how to articulate what I didn't like about it.

And I found learning about it, especially as the author traced these themes and historical elements through the lives of her main characters, to be a fascinating experience and probably one of the most educational novels I've read in a while.

The attention to detail was also excellent. I felt like the author created really grounded settings for the characters, and I enjoyed seeing how she moved the story forward with historical shifts and how that reflected in the fate of her characters' lives.

Alternatively, that same thing I enjoyed sort of ruined the experience for me. Because she covers SO much history and SO many characters—in, albeit, a quite lengthy book nearly pages—I never felt connected to anyone in particular.

I thought it started out alright, picked up around page 80 and stayed strong for the remainder of that section.

But then we jumped in time so much and through so many characters, that I never understood why I should care about them, only that they were related to previous characters.

Yaa Gyasi's Homegoing does something similar, but her time period shifts are consistent and contained, and there is a more linear and clear understanding of how and why she is moving the story along in that way.

With Pachinko we moved from character to character through the years with no real explanation as to why we are back with them.

So I'm left wondering, "what about that other character? Where did they go? When will we see them again, if ever? I found it frustrating to follow, ultimately unsatisfying, and a sort of cheap way to tell a story.

It's like she tried to inject all the drama of these big life events—pregnancies, death, runaway family members, etc.

The writing style was very straight forward. It suited the story since overall it was a detached 3rd person telling the narrative of the generations of this family and their lives.

But I didn't find the writing to be compelling enough to look forward to picking up the book. If I don't have either amazing characters or plot, I want really good writing, and this was just okay.

I know a ton of people have loved this book and given it 4 or 5 stars, but I just didn't feel that way about it. Maybe it was overhyped for me, and in combination with the things I've said above it just didn't affect me in the same way.

But I'm glad others are enjoying it, and if you aren't bothered by those elements in a story you will probably really enjoy this.

It definitely has a lot of stuff going on, is clearly well-researched and sweeping, but I felt like it didn't have enough of a thread to convince me to pull for it.

It just ended up unraveling as it went along and I lost interest. View all comments. Sylvene Thank you for your detailed review.

You clearly articulated many of my disorganized thoughts. Jun 24, PM. Pippa I completely agree with your review.

Well written Jun 27, AM. History has failed us, but no matter. Look, I get it. A lot of people won't be interested in this book because they have no idea what pachinko means and what exactly is going on with that cover, anyway?

We are highly susceptible to marketing techniques and the cover and title give us pretty much nothing. But hear me out for a minute because this book is really good.

This is a historical family saga set in Korea and Japan throughout the 20th century. It follows four generations of a Korean fami History has failed us, but no matter.

It follows four generations of a Korean family through the political turmoil of Japanese colonization, the hardship of wartimes, seeking a new and better life in Japan, and witnessing the home they left become divided into two countries they hardly recognize.

As someone who knows very little about Korean history, this book was absolutely fascinating. Rich, detailed characterization draws us into the lives of these people and, at least for me, teaches us a chapter of modern history we might not have been aware of.

Many Koreans found themselves forced to move to Japan to find jobs for their families, but they faced discrimination and disgusting living conditions when they arrived.

Pachinko, we soon find out, is a kind of Japanese arcade game, and working in a pachinko parlor was considered a typical job for a Korean looking to get ahead.

Many Japanese looked down upon pachinko parlor workers, viewing them as shady and dishonest - or just, you know, Korean. And this is something Solomon must understand.

We can be deported. We have no motherland. Life is full of things he cannot control so he must adapt. My boy has to survive. It was both interesting and deeply saddening to hear about what these people went through, how easy it was for Koreans to be imprisoned indefinitely without trial.

And after years of hardship and discrimination, after pushing through and finally earning enough money to have stability, many could never go back.

Korean-Japanese third, fourth, fifth generation even were refused citizenship in Japan but most came from North Korea, a place they could no longer safely return to.

This is both a fictional and a true story. The fictional characters the author creates come sparking off the page - from the resilient Sunja who once foolishly believed in the love of an older man, to Noa who will never quite recover from the dishonor of his lineage, to Solomon who is still trying to escape the negative stereotypes associated with Koreans many years after his grandmother arrived in Japan.

And it is a true story because much of this book was the reality for many Koreans. A deeply affecting read and a look at an area of history oft-forgotten outside of East Asia.

Blog Facebook Twitter Instagram Youtube View all 80 comments. What a marvelous, deeply engrossing novel about four generations of a Korean family in Japan.

There was a lot of story here and a lot of history of which I was woefully ignorant and it is all rendered in impeccable prose with a touch of steeliness.

Toward the end of the novel, things started to feel a bit rushed, not enough time with the characters. And certain folks just fell away but such is the nature of a sprawling multi-generational novel.

I read this in one day because I simply could not What a marvelous, deeply engrossing novel about four generations of a Korean family in Japan.

I read this in one day because I simply could not put it down. By far one of the best books I've read this year. View all 23 comments. A very enjoyable lengthy historical fiction!

Some days Sunja, daughter of the owner of a boardinghouse in Korea, felt chills when she was growing her secret child.

If she had agreed to remain the mistress of the rich man in Japan whom she got pregnant with - who was married with 3 children -- she could have been taken care of - and the needs for her child would be met.

However - Sunja couldn't agree to the arrangement. She couldn't imagine sharing her life with a man who has anothe A very enjoyable lengthy historical fiction!

Another boarder, Isak, offers to marry Sunja and raise her unborn child as his own. After conversations they have - including sharing with Sunja's mother wanting her blessing--Sunja concludes Isak is not a fool as her mother feared at first - but an angel.

Isak had one request. He believed strongly in his Korean Christian faith. Isak and Sunja traveled to Japan where they would live.

Isak was going to become the new young pastor in Japan. Koreans are discriminated against by the local Japanese.

It's not easy to be a pastors wife. Christianity in Japan is among the nations minority religions. Being Korean, Christian Faith, and a pastor's wife Once in Japan, the family faced many struggles - hard to find work was a major concern They were living in poverty, racism, To me -- there are two stories going on - side by side: A political-historical story between the cultures - and relations between Korean and Japan from the early 's to the present day focusing especially on the period when Korea was under the Japanese occupation.

I have a theory why many people don't know much about this history. It's my personal thoughts that one of the reasons American's know so little -- is that Pearl Harbor came shortly after this time --and it seems to me that wars prior that time - just before - were in the shadows - forgotten about in history.

The Rape of Nanking is another example of a long forgotten period of history -- when the Japanese invaded China in the early s. The other story going on in Pachinko -- is the personal family story.

The 'blurp' to this book says it best: "One Korean family through the generations, beginning in early s Korea. I really cannot express this novel any better For those who read it am I the only person left with questions about Noa?

Its my opinion that this book is best read when you have a long weekend. Best to curl up and spend long days reading - get swept away.

The writing is lush --gorgeous- - Min Jin Lee has written a sublime line soap opera about the ways in which people treat one another abandon and save one another.

There is a message of hope and love. View all 46 comments. Just having finished this behemoth in the last hour, I want to put a disclaimer first.

That reading this over a longer period of time than I would usually read a book, even of this length, probably made me MORE analytic than for my usual review.

Or reaction. More critical. Because I truly wanted to give it a higher star value. I really did!

But I cannot. So don't be scared away from reading it, because I am specific or amused for some of the tangents she took.

Take it with a grain of salt. Espec Just having finished this behemoth in the last hour, I want to put a disclaimer first. Especially if you are not the kind of reader that is bothered by vastly changing style of approach within one book.

The first third of this book is nearly a 5 star perfection for character development, place reality, era feel, and boding wars of surround.

In cultural mix and clash, in politico straining for the working day existence in Korea Busan under Japanese governmental domination.

Isak is a saint. His landlady and Sunja- they are sublime and so real. I'll remember them. And those two married couples and their ultimate striving, movements and eventual Osaka, Japan bound lives.

Leaving Korea and the death sentence that Christian belief insured. The world at war a mere background, but closer wars and constant work their every breath.

And then the second third of the book. The boys' stories. Hansu, yes- but mainly the boys' years of their growing up in Osaka.

The Japanese defeat years within Japan with their Korean ethnicity. This is clear and yet convoluted. Not linear and direct as the first part.

But yet, it is 4 star in the friends of each, the characters of mentoring, the parents and the Aunties' core purposes.

The differences of languages and custom and most of all- for association and work. It's a good wider tale, and well done, kept my interest.

Which gives out eventually in this parsing for a wider look at Osaka and the upcoming Pachinko connections for family support.

Just a game in a parlor! But in doing so, the epic length and detail for this family is becoming broader, although shallower- much like a river near its delta- it's becoming defused and silt laden.

The pure core of clearness for the first Korean situation is getting more progressively lost. And then the last third of the book from the late 's onward to its conclusion!

This is barely a 2. It jumps. Relationship and context become abrupt. Many tangent issues of intersect to the story become sketchy.

Is this new character or that one introduced to merely become an example for a group label or thesis issue?

We find none of the individual character self-realizations or deep core connection coming from text connotation or the visuals as went so beautifully within the first third of the book.

But instead any clarity, if any, is coming from conversations of the bemoaning failure or nasty hanger on.

Dialog becomes harsh. Style is jagged and changes abruptly as well. Description quickly becoming 10 pages of angst or venting conversation for a character who is then "dealt out" of the context or continuation of this plotting within a mere 3 lines somewhere in the next chapter?

Whatever was the style causation for this last third of the book- it was a mistake. She had too much to say?

The grandchildren's stories should have been a separate book. This decision on where to live FOR that identity of the individual- quite another whole book.

That last would have made a great story if she would have followed the style of nuance and purity for those first 2 couples who lived within Busan and knew who they were.

That one could have potential to be superb. Not added within 3 paragraphs, or as an afterthought for a partial closure. So- how do you judge this book?

Not in 40 words, that's for sure. I enjoyed the first half much more than the last. But I did read every word and read this slowly.

There was an absolute intrigue for me- to answer a question "to or for" myself about how these people would "self-describe". Are they Korean?

Are they Japanese. They hold passports from South Korea, even those who have never been there. And getting Japanese citizenship?

Well, you decide if that is a realistic possibility. Japanese want to be "the same" at their very cores- difference can and does equate to unmannerly and "wrong".

As much as I did enjoy the factual minutia of these times and places, and the mix of modes and fads displayed by those who lived them.

I also became quite aware that this essentially, in the last 50 or 60 pages of the book- holds a very anti-Japanese animus. Which became more and more openly revealed.

I would say it is a prejudice, just as equal to the one the Japanese held for Noa. So I can only give it 3 stars. It's a tremendous effort.

Places and characters here are often superbly detailed. Trying to get every victim or condition "label" issued for a human being since the middle of the last century into some action or subplot was also not a wise move.

View all 71 comments. One of the most brilliant and heartbreaking books I have ever read, I would like to thank Min Jin Lee for writing Pachinko and starting my with this splendid saga.

Pachinko follows four generations of a Korean family who move to Japan amidst Japanese colonization and political warfare.

The novel starts with Sunja, the beloved daughter of a poor yet well-respected family, whose unplanned pregnancy has the potential to bring great shame upon her life.

After she learns that the baby's father a One of the most brilliant and heartbreaking books I have ever read, I would like to thank Min Jin Lee for writing Pachinko and starting my with this splendid saga.

After she learns that the baby's father already has a wife, she refuses to stay with him and instead marries a sickly and kind minister who moves with her to Japan.

Throughout the novel we see the consequences of this choice, both through the joys of this family as they support and survive with one another, as well as the challenges and losses they experience as Korean immigrants in an unforgiving new country.

I feel so humbled and impressed by how Lee intertwines the personal and the political in Pachinko. She develops characters with deep emotions and complex yet clear motivations.

She then shows how these characters' lives are impacted by issues such as racism and xenophobia, classism and gender discrimination, body image and intergenerational trauma, and more.

Lee pulls this style of writing off so well because she captures, with elegant and straightforward prose, how these oftentimes abstract concepts directly affect her characters.

We see how Sunja fights in every way possible to ensure a good life for her children even in the face of consistent barriers related to her gender.

We see how Noa struggles to reclaim his identity after a blinding betrayal in a country that devalues Korean individuals.

We see how all of these characters' love for one another is tested by history and the forces of prejudice, discrimination, and disenfranchisement.

Lee writes the most captivating scenes, introspections, and dialogue that reveal her characters' hearts even when the world around them contains so much chaos.

I also want to commend Lee for the resilience she imbues her characters with. Despite the persistent sexism and racism they experience, Lee shows how the perseverance of women, the strength within female friendships, and the power of individual action all can create and maintain love within a messed up society.

She does not minimize or glorify the suffering her characters face. Rather, with compassion and empathy, she reveals how her characters adapt and strive to thrive and love one another amidst all of their hardships.

In the acknowledgements section of the book, Lee shares that this story has been with her for almost 30 years. I can see all that time within these pages, as the love and effort she has poured into this book and its multiple drafts comes across clear as day.

Overall, a fantastic novel I would recommend to everyone. I could write multiple essays about different parts of this book e.

As a second generation Vietnamese American living in the United States, I have felt so inspired by Lee's book to think about my family's many sacrifices coming to the United States, as well as the ways I have coped with and adapted to various forms of racism and colonization.

I am excited to see what other reads brings, and I already know Pachinko will stand as one of my favorites. View all 26 comments.

One of the things I like about reading well written historical fiction is that it can take me to another time and place and can be a profound learning experience.

Last year I read Tiger Pelt which introduced me to this time in Korea which was horrific in so many ways for the Koreans.

While this novel begins in a village in Korea, most of the story takes place in various places in Japan, but this is a Korean st One of the things I like about reading well written historical fiction is that it can take me to another time and place and can be a profound learning experience.

While this novel begins in a village in Korea, most of the story takes place in various places in Japan, but this is a Korean story about four generations of a family spanning decades.

I found myself easily engaged because I was so taken with the strength of this family who are living a difficult life of hard work, barely keeping a roof over their heads and meager food on the table.

Hoonie, a young man with physical disabilities finds happiness in an arranged marriage to Yanglin. A daughter, Sunja is born bringing joy, then heartache.

It is Sunja's story that takes us to Japan and expands into a family saga of her children and their children. So many things are depicted here - family bonds and love that moved me to tears at times, the discrimination of Koreans, even those born in Japan, culture and religion, identity, not just based on your birth place but who your family is.

While this is about that experience of Koreans in that time and place, it is ultimately about good, honest, caring people who manage to move through their lives as they deal with the things that life hands out to everyone including illness, death, disappointments.

I was curious about the meaning of the title. What does Pachinko mean? More than that, I saw it as a metaphor for so much of what happens.

Every decision made by the characters is taking a chance, a chance that they hope will move them forward, will give them a good life in spite of the hard things they endure.

Isn't that what most of us do? This is a long novel and while the last part was not as gripping to me as the first two thirds, I recommend you take a chance on it.

View all 58 comments. View all 9 comments. In the sweeping and monolithic Pachinko , Min Jin Lee documents four generations of a Korean family in Japan from to First conceived in , Lee worked on this novel for over 25 years and what a masterpiece she has to show for all her work.

Only really comparable in scope to Zola's Rougon-Macquart cycle, Pachinko is an education as well as a flawlessly crafted story.

It theorises on an ugly aspect of Japanese society and the people who struggle against this open prejudice. What I know about the history of Koreans in Japan wouldn't fill the back of a postage stamp.

To call my knowledge of the culture and politics of east Asia in the 2oth century a blindspot would be offensive to actual blindspots.

Honestly, all my knowledge of Japan comes from Sondheim's Pacific Overtures What I'm saying is that I probably know minus-information about this area of the world and its history.

So Pachinko was a real history lesson for me. But, as the Financial Times' review put it, 'we never feel history being spoon-fed to us.

Through them we witness WWII and the division of Korea, the stories and journeys of the millions of post-war Korean migrants in Japan a people known to the Japanese as the Zainichi , and the frank bigotry that many of them and their subsequent generations faced in Japanese society.

One of the novel's best characters, the Dickens-loving Noa, is described as having to 'pass' for Japanese and even hides his true Korean identify from his wife and children.

I had no idea about any of this stuff and it was truly eyeopening. But the novel is not just a history lesson: it's a veritable soap opera.

I described it to one of my friends as 'Maeve Binchy goes to Asia'. There are twists and turns in Pachinko that would have caused Jackie Collins to down the driest martini.

Love, marriage, betrayal, kimchi, death. I mean, the yakuza play a very significant role in this novel. It's a blockbuster of a book.

Your mother who only reads Danielle Steel deep-cuts would get as much enjoyment out of this as a thesis student in Asian Studies. I devoured Pachinko.

It is a somewhat dense pages but I had to constantly pull myself away from it. If left to my own devices the whole book would have been conquered in just one prolonged sitting.

Sunja's story captivated me, Noa's story intrigued me, Mozasu's story broke me, Hansu's story enraged me, Solomon's story gave me hope, and Yangjin, the woman who starts it all, she enthralled me from page one.

It is difficult to think of any novel published in the last couple of years that is even comparable to Pachinko.

One year since its publication and it has already been deemed a modern classic. Min Jin Lee has created a literary juggernaut.

And I loved it. View all 4 comments. Despite this being a pg mini brick of a book, I absolutely flew through Pachinko on two commutes and a night.

It's a sweeping, multi-generational epic of a Korean family, and we follow their collective and individual rises and falls, triumphs and failures, in - in Korea under Japanese occupation, and in Japan from - as expatriates and Zainichi Koreans.

The characters are memorable, well-drawn, and their circumstances and hurdles extremely compelling, from family shame of Despite this being a pg mini brick of a book, I absolutely flew through Pachinko on two commutes and a night.

The characters are memorable, well-drawn, and their circumstances and hurdles extremely compelling, from family shame of out of wedlock pregnancy to hunger and pride and war-time privations.

I was eager to learn more and follow these family members further, but I also wanted to the story to go on as long as possible.

It's ambitious, and Lee pulls it off masterly in my opinion. Four stars from me: not an instant classic I'll put on my immediate re-read list, but I wouldn't be surprised if I do pick it up again in the years to come.

There are so many great ideas floating throughout - what makes a nation? There's a lot to unpack on an intellectual level, and though I knew some things about the Japanese occupation and horrifying sexual slavery of Korean and other occupied Asian women as wartime "comfort women" and other pieces of the complex, complicated Japan-Korea historical relationship that only in recent years is beginning to fully normalize, I was consistently learning new ideas and words and concepts I'd never heard of prior, but these were introduced well and explained within the context of the story, so I hoovered up the information easily and eagerly.

It's the family that provides the emotional push to read. I found Lee's style to change slightly as the setting and time period change, from beautiful but simple, quiet prose during the - portion on the little, provincial island of Yeong-do in Korea, to maintaining its beauty but upping the punch and zip as the family changes location to Japan and enters the modern era, with the eerie, looming mood of pre and during WWII giving way to a slightly more upbeat and fresh tone with the family's bettered circumstances in - , but tempered by their Korean background and outsider, unwanted status in Japan.

The simple kindness of Hoonie whom kicks off the family but we never get to know well, and his strong, smart wife Yangjin; the quiet grace and devotion of Kyunghee and her husband Yoseb's evolution from man of strength and shame to fraility and greater shame; the endurance and resolution of Sunja, the engimatic, sometimes villianous but also pitiable Koh Hansu, the Christian paragon and family renewer Isak; the goodhearted, bold Mozasu as a foil to his studious, solemn half-brother Noa and their comparative experiences of passing in Japan and how they experience and internalize shame for different familial reasons in addition to their shared Korean heritage I would heartily recommend this to lovers of family and historical epics of varying lengths, lovers of beautiful but easy reading prose and where lots of plot and events are occurring but the writing is calm so you don't feel overwhelmed by the action, and those with an interest in Japanese and Korean-set historical fiction and really getting a painless education into a complex political and cultural connection.

View all 17 comments. And yet we played on, because we had hope that we might be the lucky ones.

How could you get angry at the ones who wanted to be in the game? Pachinko was a foolish game, but life was not.

This book and Wikipedia have educated me on the topic. The way I envision pachinko is as a cross between a pinball machine and a slot machine.

But folks will return again and again and spend hours in front of this parlor game with the hope of winning the big one.

Pachinko can also be likened to the lives of the numerous characters that populate this generational family saga and historical fiction novel.

They make choices, they pull the lever if you will, sometimes controlling what happens to them, but very often affected by the outside influences of others, especially those with more power.

Some of the characters in this book work for or run pachinko parlors, but the reader spends very little time in these gaming facilities —I would have been running in the other direction otherwise!

What this book does provide us with is a rich story about a family that finds its roots in Korea during the early s and straight through to late s Japan.

I love learning about countries and cultures of which I know nothing or very little. This book did not disappoint in that aspect.

Much of this is heartbreaking, frustrating, and even maddening — due to the multiple injustices suffered by this Korean family both in their home country under colonial rule by Japan, as well as in Japan where they emigrated in search of more opportunities, safety and security.

What they often found there was hatred and racial prejudices. They faced identity crises that some were able to rise above and others were not fortunate enough to overcome.

They were often discriminated against in the workplace, receiving lower wages than their Japanese counterparts.

They were called names, considered lazy, even referred to frequently as criminals. Their living conditions were run-down.

Children were bullied in their schools. The only alternative to these conditions seemed to be to return to Korea — but this means of escape was even worse following World War II with the widespread starvation and the introduction of communism in the north.

So, the family remained in Japan and made a life, despite the oppression and limitations they faced.

This book was rather hefty, but I never tired of it.

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5 comments on Pachinko

  1. Es ist schade, dass ich mich jetzt nicht aussprechen kann - es gibt keine freie Zeit. Ich werde befreit werden - unbedingt werde ich die Meinung aussprechen.

  2. Ich entschuldige mich, aber meiner Meinung nach sind Sie nicht recht. Geben Sie wir werden es besprechen. Schreiben Sie mir in PM.

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